Especially around Christmas time, the spirit of giving is pretty high on everyone's radar. For a lot of us, giving usually constitutes donating to causes or charities that we care about.

This got me thinking, for every dollar we donated, what if we donated a minute of our time? That could add up to a lot!

My experience volunteering with non-profits has shown that they rely heavily on the support of volunteers. With a lack of funding, trying to achieve what they have set out to takes a lot of man power, creative resource usage, and sometimes stress. Lately, I've tried to assess my own activity, trying to figure out how I can be more walk and less talk. I find that I'm really excited about getting involved in the causes I care about, microfinance, womens issues, and sustainability for example. Volunteering my time on the Boards and Executive committees of organizations that support this type of effort energizes me. It need not be non-profit orgs that you volunteer with, my point is wherever you see an opportunity to make an impact, do it!

So, while giving of our wallets is also really important, I imagine the impact of giving of our time could exponentially increase the value of those same dollars! As an MBA, I'm all about more bang for your buck! Just some food for thought :)

Charity Village is a great resource to find volunteer opportunities if you don't know where to start. Check out this link https://charityvillage.com/jobs/find-jobs.aspx and find your next new Social Good project! I guarantee it will be an amazing experience.
 
 
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I started thinking about why I care so much about social good, about helping people who for all intensive purposes struggle on a daily basis to make ends meet. Then irony struck me. For most things in life, we feel that if we've been in a certain situation, we can sympathize more with others who are also going through it, say the death of a loved one, a bad break up, the loss of a job, and the list goes on. Sitting today watching a special on BBC about women giving birth in poverty, it struck me, the sadness I feel comes from the fact that I see what I have, and find it hard to see others suffering so much to have just a fraction of that. For as much as I can predict about my own life, I will never bear as much suffering to have life's basic necessities as they already have. I haven't walked in their shoes, and that's why I care.

All things considered, I've led a very privileged life, there's always been a roof over my head, food on the table, people to call family, and money in my pocket. My problems are what we commonly call #firstworldproblems, like a frustrating call with a customer service rep at Rogers, not being able to upgrade my cell phone, or my persistent search for my ideal job. Call it what you want, good karma, good luck, good fortune, but the common denominator is that it's 'good', and in my experience in life, anything good should be shared. So as I think about my mission, to increase the social good quotient in the world, it really comes down to sharing the good we have in our lives with each other. To some this may sound idealistic, and preachy, but deep down, I think we all know it makes sense. Sharing doesn't mean leaving your own closet bare to help someone else, the beauty of sharing is that the more we do it, the bigger the share of pie gets for everyone, and who doesn't love pie?


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photo credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/clickflashphotos/3552515726/">ClickFlashPhotos / Nicki Varkevisser</a> via <a href="http://photopin.com">photopin</a> <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">cc</a>